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Asbestos in the United States: Occurrences, Use and Control
(Released April 2008)

 
  by Andreas Saldivar & Vicki Soto  

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News Articles

  1. Asbestos danger unites group: Cancer patients, family members tell their stories, work to get product off the market
    Amber Hunt, Detroit Free Press

    Mar. 31--For Andrew Manuel, it began with back pain. But the seemingly benign symptom turned out to be something far more sinister, and within two years, the married father of three shed 65 pounds, underwent surgery to have a lung removed and endured chemotherapy and radiation to no avail. At 42, he was dead. The killer: mesothelioma, a cancer linked to asbestos. "When I heard the diagnosis, I said, 'Meso-what?' " said Manuel's wife, Latanyta Manuel, 45, on Sunday. "All I heard was 'lung cancer,' and I said, 'No, that's not possible.' My husband never smoked or drank, but they said this cancer is about asbestos.". . . .

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  2. Condo builder tweaks tax break plan Developer had sought 20 years' abatement to ease site cleanup costs
    Joel Currier, ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

    O'FALLON, MO. -- A last-minute change to a proposed tax deal has kept alive plans for a housing development on the polluted site of a former trailer park. Under the change, University City-based Highland Homes will get 13 years of tax abatement, not 20 as originally requested. The city "thought they were going to get pimped for 20 years," said Bob Shallenberger, co-owner of Highland Homes. "They're not." After the change was made, the O'Fallon City Council voted 7-1 to create a "community improvement district" to reimburse Highland Homes an estimated $2.2 million in property and sales taxes to clean up asbestos dumped at the site.. . . .

    Copyright (c) 2008 The Post-Dispatch

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  3. Asbestos case draws inquiry; Property owner may face criminal charge
    JOHN DIEDRICH, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel 03-24-2008

    Asbestos dust was showering down on people working without masks and protective suits as they removed heating pipes from a New London apartment building last summer, according to federal documents that detail a rare criminal case being considered against a property owner over violation of the Clean Air Act. The search warrant, unsealed last week in federal court, says that last year, one of the building owners, Michael D. Phillips, had the asbestos removed illegally from the 1930s-era apartment building southwest of Green Bay. Conviction under the act can bring a fine and up to five years in prison. No one has been charged. The prosecutor said the investigation was ongoing. According to the warrant, Phillips told the building manager that if the tenants didn't like the way asbestos was being removed, he would evict them. Phillips, who owns the building with Perry A. Petta, denied he said that and said he didn't know that asbestos was dangerous.. . . .

    Copyright 2008, Journal Sentinel Inc.

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News Articles taken from ProQuest's eLibrary.

eLibrary Science

  1. Senate Passes Asbestos Ban.
    Katherine Torres
    Occupational Hazards [serial online]. November 2007;69:13.

    Abstract:
    After fighting its way through Congress for 6 years, legislation that promises to ban the import and export of asbestos was unanimously passed by the Senate, bringing the measure closer to enactment. If the bill gets through the house and does not get vetoed by President George W. Bush, the US will join more than 40 other nations that have banned the cancer-causing material, which is found in more than 3,000 consumer products. Today, the US uses about 2,000 tons of asbestos annually, down from almost 800,000 tons used in the mid-1970s.

    Copyright Penton Media, Inc. Nov 2007

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  2. Report Confirms Problems with EPA WTC Indoor "Test and Clean" Program.
    Josh Cable
    Occupational Hazards [serial online]. October 2007;16.

    Abstract:
    A recently released Government Accountability Office (GAO) report detailed serious flaws in EPA's second program seeking to address the indoor contamination resulting from the Sep 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC), as well as the agency's ability to deal with future disasters involving indoor environmental impacts. Further, the independent analysis concluded that EPA's early inaction led to its total failure, to date, to properly "characterize" the extent of the WTC contamination and that EPA officials misled the public when they mischaracterized the results of earlier asbestos testing. GAO notes that if EPA continues to fail in its responsibility, important public health needs, including resident and worker health, may not be promptly addressed.

    Copyright Penton Media, Inc. Nov 2007

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  3. Mesothelioma: Bob's story.
    Robert Owen
    The Safety & Health Practitioner [serial online]. July 2007;25:37-38,4.

    Abstract:
    The author's experience as a health and safety consultant over more than 20 years has taught him that you can never know enough. As you come across new issues you need to investigate them, identify the relevant legislation, and work out the advice best suited to the client. During the 1960s he served an apprenticeship as a heating engineer, which involved work with asbestos-cased pipe insulation materials. Forty years later, in 2005, he noticed that when gardening or undertaking any exercise activity, his breathing became labored very quickly and he would need to stop for a rest. After x-rays and CT scans he was diagnosed with mesothelioma on Sep 8, 2006 and told that if he lived for 12 months it would be a bonus. You no doubt have an asbestos management strategy in place at your premises -- please ensure it is rigorously maintained to protect others from suffering the ill health that he has experienced.

    Full Text (excerpt):
    Robert Owen CMIOSH was diagnosed with mesothelioma in September last year and sadly died six months later. He always believed that the professional advice he gave to organisations throughout his career saved many people from unnecessary pain and injury, and maybe even death. By writing this personal case study, it was his intention to continue to provide that advice by warning others of the dangers of asbestos.

    "MY EXPERIENCE AS A HEALTH AND safety consultant over more than 20 years has taught me that you can never know enough. As you come across new issues you need to investigate them, identify the relevant legislation, and work out the advice best suited to the client.

    "Issues that are practical in nature - machinery, noise, etc. - are well documented and therefore can be readily dealt with. The problem issues tend to be those relating to health - an area more difficult to find information about, although the Internet has helped enormously. Sometimes, though, the best source of information is personal experience. So here's mine - of the asbestos-related condition mesothelioma."

    The past always catches up

    "During the 1960s I served an apprenticeship as a heating engineer, which involved work with asbestos cased pipe insulation materials. The exposure could be extreme at times and no hazard warning was provided, either by the employer or by the college during C&GLI training. I completed my apprenticeship at the age of 21.1 have not worked with asbestos since.

    "Forty years later, in 2005, I noticed that when gardening or undertaking any exercise activity, my breathing became laboured very quickly and I would need to stop for a rest. I put this down to smoking and my appetite for many things but, being overweight, I didn't worry as I figured, well, I could do with losing a few pounds. But when I'd lost more than two stone and felt no fitter or better in any way, I finally went to my GP. As soon as I mentioned shortness of breath he asked about asbestos. Of course, I knew the implications. . . .

    Copyright CMP Information Ltd. Jul 2007

Taken from ProQuest's eLibrary Science.
Scholars
  1. Brooke Taylor Mossman
    Professor, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Vermont
    http://www.med.uvm.edu/pathology/webbio.asp?siteareaid=614
    Asbestos-Induced Peribronchiolar Cell Proliferation and Cytokine Production Are Attenuated in Lungs of Protein Kinase C-{delta} Knockout Mice. . . .The duration of nuclear extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 signaling during cell cycle reentry distinguishes proliferation from apoptosis in response to asbestos. . . .Src-dependent ERK5 and Src/EGFR-dependent ERK1/2 activation is required for cell proliferation by asbestos.

  2. Geoffrey Berry
    Professor Emeritus, School of Public Health, University of Sydney
    http://members.optusnet.com.au/geoffberry1/
    Age and sex differences in malignant mesothelioma after residential exposure to blue asbestos (crocidolite). . . .The risk of lung cancer with increasing time since ceasing exposure to asbestos and quitting smoking. . . .The risk of lung cancer with increasing time since ceasing exposure to asbestos and quitting smoking

  3. Raymond D. Harbison
    Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of South Florida
    http://hsc.usf.edu/publichealth/eoh/rharbison/index.htm
    Assessment of airborne asbestos exposure during the servicing and handling of automobile asbestos-containing gaskets. . . .Assessment of airborne asbestos exposure during the servicing and handling of automobile asbestos-containing gaskets. . . Airborne asbestos concentration from brake changing does not exceed permissible exposure limit

  4. James S. Webber
    Research Scientist/Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Health and Toxicology, State University of New York at Albany
    http://www.wadsworth.org/resnres/bios/webber.htm
    Performance of membrane filters used for TEM analysis of asbestos. . . .Performance of Membrane Filters Used for TEM Analysis of Asbestos. . . Evidence and reconstruction of airborne asbestos from unconventional environmental samples

Scholars taken from ProQuest's Community of Scholars