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e-Journal

 

Avian Influenza (Bird Flu)
(Released July 2007)

 
  by Sujata Suri  

Review

Key Citations

Resources

Glossary

Editor
 
Resources Websites
Illustrations
Scholars

Websites

  1. Avian Influenza (AI) Fact Sheet from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
    (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20250, USA)

  2. Avian Influenza (Bird Flu) and the Significance of its Transmission to Humans.
    (World Health Organization (WHO), Avenue Appia 20, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland)

  3. Avian Influenza (Fowl Plague).
    (Emergency Preparedness Information eXchange, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada)

  4. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza.
    (Office International des Epizooties, 12 rue de Prony 75017 Paris, France)

  5. U.S. Department of Agriculture: Avian Influenza (AI).
    (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 4700 River Road, Riverdale, MD 20737, USA)

Websites taken from Proquest CSA's Web Resources Database.

Illustrations, Figures & Tables
  1. Planning assumptions for pandemic influenza

    Invited Review: Avian influenza pandemic threat and health systems response
    Bradt, David A; Drummond, Christina M, Emergency Medicine Australasia, Vol. 18, No. 5-6, pp. 430-443. Oct 2006.
  2. Results for Trial 1, showing the percentage of seropositive birds, as determined by AGID and ELISA, in Flock 1A after AI vaccination. The serum antibody responses of the same 21 hens in a commercial egg production flock were measured by AGID and ELISA. The ages at which vaccination was given are indicated with grey arrows. The age at which the hens were moved to the production facility is indicated with a black arrow

    Persistence of Immunity in Commercial Egg-Laying Hens Following Vaccination with a Killed H6N2 Avian Influenza Vaccine
    Cardona, C.J.; Charlton, B.R.; Woolcock, P.R., Avian Diseases, Vol. 50, No. 3, pp. 374-379. Sep 2006.
  3. Seroprevalence of antibodies to AIV, IBV, reovirus, APV, ILTV, and ALV in different types of poultry flocks (closed bars) and individual birds (open bars)

    Seroprevalence of Avian Influenza Virus, Infectious Bronchitis Virus, Reovirus, Avian Pneumovirus, Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus, and Avian Leukosis Virus in Nigerian Poultry
    Owoade, A.A.; Ducatez, M.F.; Muller, C.P., Avian Diseases, Vol. 50, No. 2, pp. 222-227. Jun 2006.
  4. Planning assumptions for pandemic influenza

    Invited Review: Avian influenza pandemic threat and health systems response
    Bradt, David A; Drummond, Christina M, Emergency Medicine Australasia, Vol. 18, No. 5-6, pp. 430-443. Oct 2006.
  5. Influenza virus antigen was seen in the glial nodule and vascular endothelium (arrows) in the medulla oblongata of chicken 1 affected with HPAI. Immunoperoxidase staining. Counterstained by hematoxylin. Bar = 100 mu m

    Epidemiology, Pathology, and Immunohistochemistry of Layer Hens Naturally Affected with H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza in Japan
    Nakatani, H.; Nakamura, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, Y., Avian Diseases, Vol. 49, No. 3, pp. 436-441. Sep 2005.
Illustrations, figures & tables taken from Proquest CSA's Illustrata

Scholars
  1. Webster, Robert G.
    Professor, Department of Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center
    http://www.stjude.org/faculty/0,2512,407_2030_3957,00.html
    reassortment between theEurasian EuropeAsia lineage of avian influenza viruses and those inhumans. The data . . . originated in China. Our current findings indicate that avian influenza viruses have recentlyspread . . . isolated from humans in The Netherlands. Of great potential significance is the recent detection of avian

  2. Coombs, Kevin Marshall
    Associate Dean, Graduate Studies, University of Manitoba, 2005 - Current
    Professor/Associate Department Head, Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba
    http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/medicine/units/medical_microbiology/KevinCoombs.html
    Molecular genetic analyses of avian reoviruses:
    Because of our expertise . . . related avian reoviruses (ARV). ARV are significant pathogens of commercial poultry . . . for the next one. We are interested in understanding how the "flu" virus interacts with host cells

  3. Kawaoka, Yoshihiro
    Professor, Department of Pathobiological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    http://www.vetmed.wisc.edu/people/kawaokay
    of influenza viruses to modulate host immune responses, such as that demonstrated for the avian H5N1 . . . The generation of vaccines for highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, including those of the H5N1 subtype, relies on reverse genetics, which allows the production of influenza viruses from cloned cDNA. In the future, reverse genetics will likely be the method of choice for the generation . . . in mouse (not avian) cells, but not tropism among cells in different mouse organs. The presence of lysine

  4. Trampel, Darrell W.
    Professor, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University
    http://www.vetmed.iastate.edu/faculty_staff/profiles/dtrampel.asp
    Detection of Antibodies in Serum and Egg Yolk Following Infection of Chickens with an H6N2 Avian Influenza Virus . . . .Experimental infection of C3H mice with avian, porcine, or human isolates of Serpulina pilosicoli . . . .Experimental infection of C3H mice with avian, porcine, or human isolates of Serpulina pilosicoli

  5. Doherty, Peter Charles
    Laureate Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne
    Professor, Department of Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center
    http://www.microbiol.unimelb.edu.au/people/doherty/
    The continued westward dissemination of H5N1 influenza A viruses in avian populations and the nearly 50% mortality rate of humans infected with H5N1 are a source of great international concern. A mutant H5N1 virus with the capability to spread rapidly between humans could cause a global catastrophe . . . populations from avian or other wild-life reservoirs. Such incursions must, of course, have been happening

List of scholars taken from Proquest CSA's Community of Scholars