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e-Journal

 

Hidden Histories:
the Story of Sustainable Design

(Released June 2009)

 
  by Alison Knight  

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Dissertations

News Articles

  1. PERSPECTIVES ON SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

    Environmental Design + Construction 12-01-2006

    HELPING TO TIP THE WORLD BACK INTO BALANCE
    BY MICHAEL C. CORBY, AIA, LEED AP

    I recently read an article that said most Americans now believe in global warming but don't believe they can do anything about it. While it's easy to feel overwhelmed, architects, designers, and engineers are in the unique position to take action that can help tip the world back into balance.

    When we founded Integrated Architecture in 1988 we embraced George Bernard Shaw's vision: "You see things as they are and ask, 'Why'? I dream things as they never were and ask, 'Why not?'" Practicing 'Why not?' architecture, we wrote a mission statement that focused on stimulating and positively affecting the community and the built environment.

    Back before green was vogue, we shared our passion for sustainability with architects, realtors, students, business clubs, and anybody who would listen through presentations, lectures and case studies. We also practiced sustainable design, (then and now) whether the client asked for it or not. Our mindset is not to treat sustainability as a capability we can apply if you want, but more importantly an obligation and a responsibility that we integrate into our practice.

    While not every project we create will achieve LEED certification, we do educate every client (and potential client) about the benefits of sustainable design, lifecycle cost and the positive influence of abundant natural light and fresh air. . . .

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's eLibrary

  2. Using Design to Advance Environmental Stewardship

    Winter, Metta
    Human Ecology 12-01-2003

    In his research, writing, teaching, and artwork, Jack Elliott is one of a small number of design professionals in the country focused on realigning aesthetics and ethical values. This architect and assistant professor in the Department of Design and Environmental Analysis encourages designers to create innovative, sustainable solutions for environmental and social issues.

    Last summer, Elliott presented a paper at the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture's international symposium in Helsinki, Finland. Titled "Reflecting Eco-Ethics, Architectural Aesthetics Reconsidered," it ended with this message to his colleagues: "Through its manifest aesthetic devices, architecture communicates its sympathies, based on values and feelings, and its rationalizations, based on knowledge and understanding. It is the realignment of this hybrid that offers hope. It makes the aesthetic experience capable of incorporating a new ethical sensitivity, an expanded sympathy to things non-human in order to effect real environmental change."

    Elliott believes that design has the ability to provide ethical leadership for the environment through its aesthetic expression, and that designers have the responsibility to innovate within this eco-ethic, thus helping assure a sustainable future. . . .

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's eLibrary

  3. Natural designs

    Environment 03-01-2002

    Biomimicry-looking to nature for engineering inspiration-is gaining new momentum as manufacturers search for more environmentally responsible and inexpensive ways to make products with fewer materials. For example, the concept behind a selfcleaning leaf has been applied to a house paint made in Germany that is guaranteed to stay clean for five years without the use of detergents or sandblasters. After studying the composition of thousands of plant surfaces with a scanning electron microscope, German botanist Wilhelm Barthlott discovered that the leaves of the white lotus flower have tiny points on them, much like a bed of nails. . . .

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's eLibrary

  4. Nature's Solutions

    Hall, Leslie
    National Geographic Explorer 01-01-2009

    People like to make things work better, faster, and cleaner. Luckily, they can turn to nature for some great ideas.

    We can learn a lot from nature. Just think about it. Nature always seems to work well. Plants and animals don't waste energy, and they usually don't harm the environment. So engineers are turning to nature for some solutions to everyday problems.

    Problem: How can we help athletes swim even faster?

    Solution: Look closely at a shark's skin. . . .

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's eLibrary

  5. THE FUTURE OF WASTE

    Spiegelman, Helen; Sheehan, Bill
    BioCycle 01-01-2004

    MUNICIPAL recyclers and solid waste managers often see composting as the feeble step child of resource management. In fact, recycling biodegradable organics was the big recycling success story in the United States during the 1990s.

    Understanding the fundamental difference between community-generated organics and manufactured products and packaging is a key to achieving sustainable production and consumption systems. In the future, recycling of community-generated organics will increasingly become the centerpiece of municipal waste management. This is because community-generated organics will be the only material left. Products and packaging will have found their way back to the marketplace without ever becoming part of the municipal waste management system.

    The world envisioned by Bill McDonough, Michael Braungart and a growing number of Zero Waste advocates distinguishes between two basic types of resources. "Technical nutrients" are recyclable and reusable products that should be designed to remain in the industrial cycle perpetually. "Biological nutrients" are materials that can be safely cycled back into the biosphere via composting. The keys to economic nutrition are keeping biological and technical nutrients separate, so that each can be fully "up-cycled" to remain in the economic food chain, and phasing out unsafe and mixed products.

    Interestingly, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) got it right decades ago when they started tracking what we call "municipal solid waste" (MSW). . . .

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's eLibrary

Historical Newspapers
  1. CITY PLANS STUDY ON USE OF SPACES; Architect Is Hired to Assist in Environmental Design

    By CHARLES G. BENNETT. New York Times. New York, N.Y.: Aug 12, 1967. pg. 27, 1 pgs

    Abstract (Summary)
    A $55,000 study to improve the quality of environmental design and the use of open space in the city's housing and renewal program was announced yesterday at City Hall.

    Original Newspaper Image (PDF)

  2. Environmental Design for 1970's Theme of National Engineers' Week

    WILLIAM URBAN. The Hartford Courant. Feb 22, 1970. pg. 69A, 1 pgs

    Abstract (Summary)
    The National Society of Professional Engineers last fall declared Feb. 22-28, 1970 as National Engineers' Week, with the theme "Environmental Design for the 1970's." By coincidence February issues of several magazines carried feature. . .

    Original Newspaper Image (PDF)

  3. Environmental design 'positively tackled'

    Henry Mangan. The Irish Times. Dublin, Ireland: Dec 2, 1986. p. II (1 page)

    Original Newspaper Image (PDF)

Taken from ProQuest's Historical Newspapers.

Dissertations

  1. A case study examination: Developing a retail store renovation design according to the LEED rating system

    by McKinley, Heather, M.S., Oklahoma State University, 2008, 62 pages

    Abstract (Summary)
    Scope and Method of Study. Developing a retail environment that is sustainable can be challenging. Interior designers must educate businesses on the importance of sustainability. Sustainable practices have been shown to improve employee productivity, increase customer perception and spending, and reduce the operating costs . The purpose of this study was to evaluate an existing retail store and production site and to propose a design solution that followed a sustainable framework. This study illustrates how 17B was renovated using LEED's framework.

    Findings and Conclusions. The methodology was divided into four phases: Analysis of Existing Conditions, Programming, Assessment of LEED Criteria and Design Development. The results determined the goals and objectives for the project and design concept. Research was conducted in three LEED performance areas to find the most effective methods for meeting the project goals. The methods accomplished sustainable design of the project.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's
    Dissertations & Theses Database

  2. Adaptive reuse in Martinsburg: The Interwoven School of Crafts

    by McIntyre, Kristina Marie, M.Arch., University of Maryland, College Park, 2008, 181 pages

    Abstract (Summary)
    This thesis explores critical regionalism and sustainable design through the adaptive reuse of the former Interwoven Stocking Company mill in Martinsburg, West Virginia. New programming establishes the manufacturing complex as the Interwoven School of Crafts, a learning institution dedicated to the production of functional, handcrafted arts and thereby also to the continuance of local culture.

    Regionalistic ideas are further explored through the development of a visitor center and gallery building that showcases the work of the artists. Nestled within the historic complex, this contemporary building is the interface between spaces, materials, and time periods. By building a contemporary structure the character of the existing buildings is enhanced by the contrast rather than trivialized by imitation or replication. By designing with sustainable principles and building craft in mind the newer components will contribute to both the character and the long lifespan of what is already on site.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's
    Dissertations & Theses Database

  3. Applying community design principles to amenity area development in Ontario's Blue Mountains

    by Wilmink, Corinne, M.L.A., University of Guelph (Canada), 2008, 106 pages

    Abstract (Summary)
    Amenity migration is the settlement of people on a permanent or intermittent basis in places that are perceived to be rich in environmental and cultural amenities. The resulting community often has negative social, economic and environmental impacts, which will be addressed using established community design approaches that demonstrate significant contributions to sustainable design. A set of community design principles will be synthesized from these approaches and applied to the design of Castle Glen Development, near the amenities of Ontario's Blue Mountains. The design is evaluated using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Neighbourhood Developments (LEED-ND) rating tool to assess the sustainability of the design. Results indicate that the design does not meet the sustainable neighbourhood development standards accepted by LEED-ND due primarily to the remoteness of the proposed site within the amenity area. Nonetheless, application of the principles did contribute to reducing the negative impacts of the development and meeting the potential needs of amenity migrants.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's
    Dissertations & Theses Database

  4. Design2sustain---A web based resource suite for sustainability designed for undergraduate architecture programs

    by Marathe, Shraddha R., M.B.S., University of Southern California, 2008, 153 pages

    Abstract (Summary)
    Committed to the 2010 Imperative, the University of Southern California (USC), School of Architecture, now aims at a carbon neutral environment and eco-literacy in all its courses. Every design studio is now mandated to work towards sustainable design philosophy. The 2010 imperative goals challenge the existing curriculum structure and teaching methods. It demands accommodation for updated and newer design philosophies and processes. This study analyzes and outlines possible insertions in the current curriculum for attaining the sustainability target.

    The purpose of this study is to establish a supplementary tool that assists in developing a sustainable approach towards architectural design. A web-based, quick reference guide on sustainability and energy efficiency is proposed for students to assist in the design studios. The website offers categorized data on the basis of scope, design process and the ability of students to assimilate the information. Important definitions, concepts, tools and methods for sustainable design development are compiled in a concise format. Tutorials on sustainability and building performance tools are developed. A detailed database for one studio is developed as a prototype. This thesis analyzes the viability of introducing a good website in the design studios as a regularly updated resource for sustainable architectural design.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's
    Dissertations & Theses Database