ProQuest www.csa.com
 
 
RefWorks
  
Discovery Guides Areas
>
>
>
>
>
 
  
e-Journal

 

Natural Miracles:
What Functional Foods Can Do for You?

(Released October 2007)

 
  by Leila Kiani  

Review

Key Citations

Visual Resources

News & Scholars

Glossary

Editor
 
Resources Newspapers & Journals
Scholars

Newspapers & Journals

  1. Study Identifies Factors Influencing Food Choice and Solutions for Eating More Healthfully
    PR Newswire 09-05-2007

    PITTSBURGH, Sept. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- New research from Rutgers University confirms that America's diet is out of shape. The study, published in the July/Sept. issue of Topics in Clinical Nutrition summarized peer-reviewed research from 1996 to 2007 on Americans' dietary intake; food choice motivators, eating times and locations; and food preparation habits.

    The purpose of the study, funded by the Canned Food Alliance, was to better understand why Americans eat the way they do and to provide recommendations for how Americans can achieve a healthier diet by identifying the behaviors and motivators that influence Americans' food consumption. The research showed that people are eating too much fat, calories, added sugar and sodium, and not enough important nutrients such as fiber, vitamin A and calcium. . . .

    SOURCE Canned Food Alliance

    Printer Friendly Version (PDF)

  2. Nature gets a hand
    Meg Carter
    Times of London 08-13-2005

    Positive food additives promise health benefits on a plate, but can they deliver, asks Meg Carter

    "Natural good, processed bad" is the view shared by many British shoppers frightened by health scares ranging from BSE and GM food to Sudan 1. But growing anxiety about our health and an acceptance that responsibility for it may rest in our own hands is fuelling soaring sales of nutraceuticals, so-called functional foods and drinks manufactured to contain positive additives to make us healthier, such as probiotics and calorie-reducing spreads. Without doubt, functional foods are proving great business for a food industry battered by recent criticism that an over-emphasis on super-sizing, high fat, salt and sugar content has fuelled unhealthy lifestyles and overeating. British consumers' spending on functional foods and drinks is fast approaching Pounds 1 billion and could double that by 2010.

    However, the dizzying array of functional additives now slipping into our daily diet - good bacteria to aid healthy gut function and plant sterols to lower blood cholesterol - raises an important issue. Do we really need to buy specially manufactured functional products, such as cholesterol-lowering spreads, many of which are priced at a premium? Wouldn't we be better off upping our intake of the unprocessed products in which many functional food ingredients occur naturally? . . .

    Copyright (c) Times Newspapers Limited 2005

    Printer Friendly Version (PDF)

  3. Current international approaches to food claims
    Kwak, No-Seong; Jukes, David John
    Nutrition Reviews 12-01-2000

    The market for functional foods is rapidly increasing. It is necessary to establish a legal framework for these foods. This has proved difficult in a number of countries. The control through health claims is generally accepted as the most appropriate measure. Activity in this area has been developing both at the national and international levels. However, the regulations and proposals from a number of national authorities and other nongovernmental sectors are varied and difficult to reconcile. This paper examines the range of health claim controls being used in the food area. They are considered in detail so as to establish a better understanding of the claims. In this paper, the claims have been classified into six categories: nutrient content claims, comparative claims, nutrient function claims, claims related to dietary guidelines or healthy diets, enhanced function claims, and reduction of disease risk claims. Of these, the latter four claims are considered to have significant implications for functional foods. . . .

    Copyright International Life Sciences Institute and Nutrition Foundation

    Printer Friendly Version (PDF)

  4. Diet and nutrition bridging mainstream practice and complementary and alternative medicine
    Touger-Decker, Riva; Rigassio, Diane
    Neurology Report 06-01-2001

    Nutrition and diet are categorized by the National Center for Complementary and Altemative Medicine (NCCAM) as forms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) under the categories of "Alternative Medical Systems" and "Biological Based Therapies."1 They are considered CAM by following the definition in which CAM is treatments and health care practices not taught widely in medical schools, not generally used in hospitals, and not usually reimbursed by medical insurance companies.2 While in fact general principles of nutrition and diet are considered to be in the mainstream of practice.

    Diet is a cornerstone of disease prevention and management. The landmark studies on diabetes,3 hypertension,4 and other diseases have provided scientific evidence of the value of diet and nutrition in disease prevention and management. Dietary supplements,functional foods and phytochemicals,are also considered CAM therapies (under the biologically based therapies), and are intended to 'supplement,' not replace foods in the diet. . . .

    Printer Friendly Version (PDF)

News Articles taken from Proquest's eLibrary.

Scholars
  1. Willett, Walter Churchill
    Cardiology, Harvard University
    http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/faculty/walter-willett/
    for monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans-unsaturated, animal and vegetable fat, cholesterol and egg intakes... functional data exist on FOK1 and previous studies have suggested a relation between BSM1 and breast . . . Carotenoids, found in fruits and vegetables, have the potential to protect against cancer because of their properties, including their functions as precursors to vitamin A and as antioxidants. We examined the associations between intakes of alpha -carotene, beta -carotene, beta -cryptoxanthin

  2. Spiegelman, Donna
    Professor, Department of Biostatistics, Harvard University
    http://www.dfhcc.harvard.edu/no_cache/membership/member-profile/member/255/0
    for monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans-unsaturated, animal and vegetable fat, cholesterol and egg intakes . . . Carotenoids, found in fruits and vegetables, have the potential to protect against cancer because of their properties, including their functions as precursors to vitamin A and as antioxidants. We examined the associations between intakes of alpha -carotene, beta -carotene, beta -cryptoxanthin

  3. Drewnowski, Adam
    Professor, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington
    adamdrew@u.washington.edu
    nutrient-dense lean meats, fish, fresh vegetables, and fruit generally cost more. An inverse relationship . . ., and fresh vegetables and fruit. There is an inverse relationship between energy density of foods... per day reduction in diet costs. In contrast, each additional 100 g of fruit and vegetables

  4. Bowen, Deborah J.
    Social and Behavioral Sciences, Boston University
    http://myprofile.cos.com/bowend07
    to change dietary behaviors (lowering fat, increasing fruit and vegetable consumption) among members of religious organizations aged 18 and over. The primary outcomes are fat- and fruit- or vegetable

  5. Nestle, Marion
    Paulette Goddard Professor, Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, New York University
    http://www.foodpolitics.com
    nutrients and other chemicals derived from food plants. Instead, we argue that consumption...View that food safety is a matter of politics and requires government and industry to act more in the public interest; case studies of microbial contamination of meat and poultry, genetically modified ingredients in supermarket products, and newly emerging health hazards, including bioterrorism.... pattern based largely on grains, fruit and vegetables, with smaller amounts of meat and dairy foods, and even smaller amounts of foods high in fat and sugar. Such diets are demonstrably health

Scholars taken from Proquest's Community of Scholars