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Chinggis Khan: Conquering the Army That Conquered the World
(Released April 2011)

 
  by Erin McCoy  

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  1. Capitalist democracy among Mongolian herders: Discourse or ideology?

    Paula L. W. Sabloff.

    Human organization, Vol. 69, No. 1, Spr 2010, pp. 86-96.

    Although Mongolian herders sound as if they have adopted capitalist democracy, they are really using the discourse to express their own ideology. Based on cognitive data collected in 1998 and 2003, this paper uses connectionist theory to show that Mongolian herders' political model is shaped by the nexus of three phenomena: (1) a post-socialist political economy granting herders rights and freedoms along with economic responsibility at the family/household level, (2) the pre-socialist cultural themes of appreciation for independence, perception of leaders as distant patrons, and their own isolation from governance; and (3) emotions that guide the interpretation of both, including joy at attaining rights and freedoms, hope of success and fear of failure, and indifference to governance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

  2. Kinship and cooperation: The axe fight revisited

    Michael Alvard.

    Human Nature.Special Issue: Evolutionary studies of cooperation, Vol. 20, No. 4, Dec 2009, pp. 394-416.

    Chagnon's analysis of a well-known axe fight in the Yanomamö village of Mishimishiböwei-teri (Chagnon and Bugos 1979) is among the earliest empirical tests of kin selection theory for explaining cooperation in humans. Kin selection theory describes how cooperation can be organized around genetic kinship and is a fundamental tool for understanding cooperation within family groups. Previous analysis on groups of cooperative Lamaleran whale hunters suggests that the role of genetic kinship as a principle for organizing cooperative human groups could be less important in certain cases than previously thought (Alvard Human Nature 14:129–163, 2003b). Evidence that supports a strong role for genetic kinship—groups are found to be more related than expected by chance —may be spurious because of the correlation between social structure and genetic kinship. Reanalysis of Chagnon's data using matrix regression techniques, however, confirms that genetic kinship was the primary organizing principle in the axe fight; affinal relations were also important, whereas lineage identity explained nothing. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved) (journal abstract)

  3. A theory for formation of large empires

    Peter Turchin.

    Journal of global history, Vol. 4, No. 2, Jul 2009, pp. 191-218.

    Between 3000 BCE and 1800 CE there were more than sixty 'mega-empires' that, at the peak, controlled an area of at least one million square kilometres. What were the forces that kept together such huge pre-industrial states? I propose a model for one route to mega-empire, motivated by imperial dynamics in eastern Asia, the world region with the highest concentration of mega-empires. This 'mirror-empires' model proposes that antagonistic interactions between nomadic pastoralists and settled agriculturalists result in an autocatalytic process, which pressures both nomadic and farming polities to scale up polity size, and thus military power. The model suggests that location near a steppe frontier should correlate with the frequency of imperiogenesis. A worldwide survey supports this prediction: over 90% of mega-empires arose within or next to the Old World's and belt, running from the Sahara desert to the Gobi desert. Specific case studies are also plausibly explained by this model. There are, however, other possible mechanisms for generating empires, of which a few are discussed at the end of the article. Reprinted by permission of Cambridge University Press. An electronic version of this article can be accessed via the internet at http://journals.cambridge.org

  4. Chinggis Khan

    Michal Biran and George Lane.

    Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. 18, No. 2, Apr 2008, pp. 230-233.

    The publication of a book by Michal Biran initiates a wave of anticipatory excitement resonating around the world of mediaeval Asian studies. Her papers and presentations have already built her a formidable reputation and therefore it can safely be assumed that any major piece of work which she feels is ready for general distribution is the result and fruit of considerable research and long, meticulous preparation. Her academic credentials were assured and demonstrated to be of the highest calibre with the publication in 2005 of her penetrating monograph on the Qarakhitai while her collaboration with Reuven Amitai in producing 'Mongols, Turks, and Others' established her position amongst the foremost authorities on the Mongol Empire. She represents the new generation of Mongolist scholars who have inherited and built on the hard work of such imposing academics as Boyle, Jackson, de Rachewiltz, Ratchnevsky, Allsen, Morgan et al and are now able to bask in the renaissance of Chinggisid studies.

  5. Genghis Khan, Mongolia and the theory of human security

    Robert E. Bedeski.

    China and Eurasia forum quarterly, Vol. 6, No. 4, Nov-Dec 2008, pp. 81-102.

    By 1279, the Mongols ruled nearly a quarter of the earth's surface. To understand the origins of that remarkable empire and the political dimensions of its founder, Genghis Khan an anthropocentric methodology and theory of human security is used. The core of the theory is that man's will to survive is at the core of social and political institutions. The theory is applied to Mongol nomadic society and the career of Genghis Khan, and explains the unique characteristics of the Mongol state – an entity which was global for its time, and influenced the development of Asian states for centuries.

  6. Personality and the fate of organizations

    Robert Hogan.

    Mahwah, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Publishers, 2007, ix

    (From the cover) Personality and performance are intricately linked, and personality has proven to have a direct influence on an individual's leadership ability and style, team performance, and overall organizational effectiveness. In Personality and the Fate of Organizations, author Robert Hogan offers a systematic account of the nature of personality, showing how to use personality to understand, evaluate, select, deselect, train, and understand organizations. This book brings insights from a leading industrial organizational psychologist who asserts that personality is real, and that it determines the careers of individuals and the fate of organizations. The author's goal is to increase the reader's ability to understand other people—how they are alike, how they are different, and why they do what they do. Armed with understanding, readers will be able to pursue their personal, social, and organizational goals more efficiently. A practical reference, this book is extremely useful for MBA students and for all those studying organizational psychology and leadership. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

  7. The making of a Sufi: al-Nuwayri's account of the origin of Genghis Khan

    Lyall Armstrong.

    Mamluk Studies Review, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2006, pp. 153-160.

    The historian describes Genghis Khan's pursuit of God in manifestly Sufi terminology.

  8. The great jasaq of Gengis Khan, the empire, Mongol culture and Sharia

    Denise Aigle.

    Journal of the economic and social history of the Orient, Vol. 47, No. 1, 2004, pp. 31-79.

    ABSTRACT IN ENGLISH: Mongol law, the jasaq, has provided the basis for a long tradition of studies which were inaugurated by Petis de la Croix in 1710. He was the first to define a list of precepts of the jasaq, but without taking into consideration either the chronology or their origins. Most subsequent scholars dealing with the question revived this same vision of the jasaq. Debate was especially focused on whether or not the Mongols possessed a written code of laws. But, until now, little discussion has taken place concerning what the jasaq represented for the Mongols themselves and how this Mongol law was perceived by Mediaeval authors who, on the whole, confused the imperial edicts (jasaq) with customs (yosun). The present article is an attempt to clarify these issues. The author examines the jasaq in its politico-cultural context and, in particular, the analysis of the precepts takes into consideration shamanism, the Mongol system of representations. Reasons for the lack of understanding by Muslims of certain customs in disharmony with Islam are thereby highlighted, reasons which led them to see, in the jasaq, an equivalent of the shari'a: a Mongol order imposed on populations which had fallen under their domination. Reprinted by permission of Brill Academic Publishers.

  9. The secret history of the Mongols: the life and times of Chinggis Khan

    Urgunge Onon and A. Hürelbaatar.

    Inner Asia, Vol. 4, No. 1, 2002, pp. 167-169.

    Onon's translation of "The Secret History of the Mongols" is reviewed.

  10. Praising Cinggis Qagan and His Campaigns

    Elisabetta Chiodo.

    Ural-Altaische Jahrbücher, Vol. 17, No. , 2001, pp. 189-233.

    Folk literature and poetry about Chinggis Khan is discussed.

  11. "What the partridge told the eagle: a neglected Arabic source on Chinggis Khan and the early history of the Mongols"

    The Mongol Empire and its legacy

    R. Irwin.

    Leiden: Brill, 5-11

    1999

    A chapter in a collection of essays on the Mongol Empire is presented.

  12. On some problems concerning Jochi's lifetime

    QuDafeng and LiuJianyi.

    Central Asiatic journal, Vol. 42, No. 2, 1998, pp. 283-290.

    An article is presented that traces the history of Jochi Khan, the eldest son of Chinggis Khan during the beginning of the Mongol Empire. It attempts to study the subsequent problems that confronted Jochi Khan after the death of his father: inheritance and the transmission of power. French version: Cet article retrace l'histoire du prince Jochi Khan, fils aîné de Chinggis Khan pendant la période initiale de l'empire Mongol. Il s'agit d'étudier les problèmes auxquels fut confronté Jochi Khan à la mort de son père : héritage et transmission du pouvoir.

  13. The history and life of the Chinggis Khan

    Urgunge Onon and Alan J. K. Sanders.

    Pacific affairs, Vol. 66, No. 1, Spring 1993, pp. 108.

    Onon's translation of "The History and Life of Chinggis Khan" is reviewed.

  14. Epic Themes in the Secret History of the Mongols

    Larry W. Moses.

    Folklore, Vol. 99, No. 2, 1988, pp. 170-173.

    Moses's examination of "The Secret History of the Mongols" is presented.

  15. The birth and childhood of Genghis Khan

    J. A. Boyle.

    Journal of the Anglo-Mongolian Society, Vol. 4, No. 1, 1978, pp. 8-13.

    Genghis Khan's birth and childhood are discussed.

  16. Ibn Khaldun's Sources for the History of Jenghiz Khan and the Tatars

    Walter J. Fischel.

    Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 76, No. 2, 1956, pp. 91-99.

    15th-century Arab polymath Ibn Khaldun's history of Genghis Khan is discussed.

  17. Ölün's Chemise. An Episode from the 'Secret History of the Mongols'

    Leonardo Olschki.

    Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 67, No. 1, 1947, pp. 54-56.

    An episode from "The Secret History of the Mongols" involving the abduction of Chinggis' mother, Ölün, by Yesugei is discussed.

  18. The Scope and Contents of Chingis Khan's Yasa

    George Vernadsky.

    Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Vol. 3, no. 3-4, No. , 1938, pp. 337-360.

    The existing fragments of the Yasa, Chinggis Khan's code of laws and ordinances, are discussed.

  19. Genghis Khan, Mongolia and the theory of human security

    Robert E. Bedeski.

    China and Eurasia forum quarterly, Vol. 6, No. 4, Nov-Dec 2008, pp. 81-102.

    By 1279, the Mongols ruled nearly a quarter of the earth's surface. To understand the origins of that remarkable empire and the political dimensions of its founder, Genghis Khan an anthropocentric methodology and theory of human security is used. The core of the theory is that man's will to survive is at the core of social and political institutions. The theory is applied to Mongol nomadic society and the career of Genghis Khan, and explains the unique characteristics of the Mongol state - an entity which was global for its time, and influenced the development of Asian states for centuries.

  20. Beyond the legacy of Genghis Khan

    Linda Komaroff and George Lane.

    Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. 17, No. 4, Oct 2007, pp. 473-479.

    A volume comprises papers which were originally delivered at a symposium
    connected with New York's Museum of Modern Art exhibition of Ilkhanid art but which have subsequently been updated and transformed into fully-fledged erudite monographs is reviewed.

  21. DATING THE TAVAN TOLGOI SITE, MONGOLIA : BURIALS OF THE NOBILITY FROM GENGHIS KHAN'S ERA Datation du site de Tavan Tolgoi, Mongolie : sépultures de la noblesse de l'époque de Gengis Khan

    M. Youn, J. C. Kim, H. K. Kim, et al.

    19th International Radiocarbon Conference, Keble College, Oxford, England. 3-7 April 2006

    The Tavan Tolgoi (Five Holy Hills) site, located in Ongon sum, Sukhbaatar aimag, in southeastern Mongolia, consists of about 20 burials. During the preliminary 2004 excavations conducted by the Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, National University of Mongolia, 7 graves were unearthed. In grave 1 (2004), the skeleton of a woman 40 yr old, wearing golden rings with the inscription of a Siberian falcon, was found together with other ornamental artifacts. In grave 2 (2004), a man with a gold-gilded saddle and a horse were buried. Adornments strongly indicate that these burials date to the Great Mongol Empire period and may relate to the Golden Horde lineage of Genghis Khan. Initial accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) radiocarbon dating of wood from a coffin at burial 2004-6 (Table 1) gave an age of 860 ± 60 BP, and the age of a human bone sample from burial 2004-1 was determined as 890 ± 40 BP. Subsequent excavations yielded 13 samples for 14C dating, and 7 of them have been dated thus far. The calibrated dates were in the range of AD 1130-1250, which is in agreement with Genghis Khan's life span. Artifacts strongly suggest that these burials belong to nobility or members of the royal family. Given that such burials are hard to find, the Tavan Tolgoi site is expected to yield important archaeological and historical information. In this paper, the historical importance of the artifacts recovered is discussed in light of 14C dating and the results of additional scientific analyses.

  22. Genghis Khan's greatest general: Subotai the Valiant

    Richard A. Gabriel and George Lane.

    Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Vol. 17, No. 4, Oct 2007, pp. 471-473.

    Gabriel's book that examines Genghis Khan's general, Subotai Noyan, is reviewed.

  23. Genghis Khan and the making of the modern world

    Jack Weatherford and Darwin H. Stapleton.

    Technology and culture, Vol. 47, No. 4, Oct 2006, pp. 830-831.

    Stapleton reviews "Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World," by Jack Weatherford.