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Linguistics and the Law
(Released September 2001)

 
  by Colleen B. Brennan  

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Key Citations Short Format Full Format
  1. Fragmented Narratives and Multiple Tellers: Witness and Defendant Accounts in Trials
    Discourse Studies, 2001, 3, 1, Feb, 53-74

  2. US Pattern Jury Instructions: Problems and Proposals
    Forensic Linguistics, 2000, 7, 1, 49-71

  3. Effects of Preinstruction and Linguistic Simplification on Juror Comprehension of Capital Sentencing Instructions
    Dissertation Abstracts International, B: Sciences and Engineering, 2000, 60, 7, Jan, 3624-B

  4. Creoles and Comprehension in the Courtroom
    Dissertation Abstracts International, A: The Humanities and Social Sciences, 1999, 60, 4, Oct, 1105-A

  5. Varying Realities: Patterned Changes in the Interpreter's Representation of Courtroom and External Realities
    Applied Linguistics, 1999, 20, 2, June, 203-220

  6. And-Prefaced Questions in Institutional Discourse
    Linguistics, 1999, 37, 2(360), 251-274

  7. Intertextuality, Affect, and Ideology in Legal Discourse
    Text, 1999, 19, 1, 73-109

  8. Bilingual Legal Interpreter Education
    Forensic Linguistics, 1999, 6, 1, 109-114

  9. Interpreters' Treatment of Discourse Markers in Courtroom Questions
    Forensic Linguistics, 1999, 6, 1, 57-82

  10. Questioning in Interpreted Testimony
    Forensic Linguistics, 1999, 6, 1, 83-108

  11. The Role of the Interpreter in the Adversarial Courtroom
    Chpt in THE CRITICAL LINK: INTERPRETERS IN THE COMMUNITY: PAPERS FROM THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTERPRETING IN LEGAL, HEALTH, AND SOCIAL SERVICE SETTINGS (GENEVA PARK, CANADA, JUNE 1-4, 1995), Carr, Silvana E., Roberts, Roda, Dufour, Aideen, & Steyn, Dini [Eds], Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1997, pp 29-34

  12. The Interpreter on Trial: Pragmatics in Court Interpreting
    Chpt in THE CRITICAL LINK: INTERPRETERS IN THE COMMUNITY: PAPERS FROM THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTERPRETING IN LEGAL, HEALTH, AND SOCIAL SERVICE SETTINGS (GENEVA PARK, CANADA, JUNE 1-4, 1995), Carr, Silvana E., Roberts, Roda, Dufour, Aideen, & Steyn, Dini [Eds], Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1997, pp 201-211

  13. Language, Law, and Power
    Carleton Papers in Applied Language Studies, 1997, 14, 41-51

  14. On the Horns of a Dilemma: Accuracy vs Brevity in the Use of Legal Terms by Court Interpreters
    The ATA Chronicle, 1996, 25, 9, Sept, 24,26-27,29

  15. Language and the Law: Linguistics to the Rescue?
    Language and Communication, 1996, 16, 3, July, 301-313

  16. Lawyers' Work in the Menendez Brothers' Murder Trial
    Issues in Applied Linguistics, 1996, 7, 1, June, 19-32

  17. Can Linguists Help Judges Know What They Mean? Linguistic Semantics in the Court-Room
    Forensic Linguistics, 1996, 3, 2, 250-272

  18. A Different Story: Narrative versus 'Question and Answer' in Aboriginal Evidence
    Forensic Linguistics, 1996, 3, 2, 273-288

  19. Replies to Negative Questions in the Courtroom
    American Speech, 1996, 71, 1, spring, 109-111

  20. The Use of Translators and Interpreters in Cases Requiring Forensic Speaker Identification
    Chpt in TRANSLATION AND THE LAW, Morris, Marshall [Ed], Amsterdam, The Netherlands: John Benjamins Publishing Co, 1995, pp 131-144

  21. Pragmatics and Power
    Journal of Pragmatics, 1995, 23, 2, Feb, 117-135

  22. Interpreting in a Cross-Cultural Cross-Examination: An Aboriginal Case Study
    International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 1995, 113, 99-111

  23. Criteria for Earwitness Lineups
    Forensic Linguistics, 1995, 2, 2, 143-153

  24. The Politeness of Judges: American and English Judicial Behaviour
    Journal of Pragmatics, 2001, 33, 1, Jan, 61-85

  25. Semantic Changes in the Language of the Law
    Hebrew Linguistics, 2001, 48, Jan, 55-62

  26. Discursive Constructions of Child Sexual Abuse: Conduct, Credibility and Culpability in Trial Judgment
    Dissertation Abstracts International, B: Sciences and Engineering, 2000, 61, 3, Sept, 1698-B

  27. Unlocking the Jury Box: Structure, Leadership, and Storytelling in Jury Deliberations
    Dissertation Abstracts International, A: The Humanities and Social Sciences, 2000, 60, 12, June, 4249-A

  28. The Complexity of Legal English Translation and Its Meaning Incoherence in the Target Language
    Unesco ALSED-LSP Newsletter, 2000, 23, 1(49), June, 59-71

  29. Intertextual Authority in Reported Speech: Production Media in the Kennedy Smith Rape Trial
    Journal of Pragmatics, 2000, 32, 7, June, 879-914

  30. Increasing Lawyer Communication Competence: The Law as Practice
    Dissertation Abstracts International, A: The Humanities and Social Sciences, 2000, 60, 11, May, 3842-A

  31. The Right to Understand the Right of Silence: A Few Comments Forensic Linguistics, 2000, 7, 2, 244-248

  32. Interpreting for the Police: Issues in Pre-Trial Phases of the Judicial Process
    Forensic Linguistics, 2000, 7, 2, 212-237

  33. Are Laws [Still] Unreachable?
    Linguistica, 2000, 40, 1, 131-150

  34. From the Evaluation of Speaker Recognition Systems to the Questioning of Expertise in Forensic Speaker Identification
    Cahiers d'etudes et de recherches francophones: Langues, 1999, 2, 4, Dec, 270-288

  35. The Grammaticalization of Participant Roles in the Constitution of Expert Identity
    Language in Society, 1999, 28, 4, Dec, 491-521

  36. How Long Is Life-Long? Juridicial Definitional Semantics and Common Language Usage
    Deutsche Sprache, 1999, 27, 3, 236-248

  37. Rape and the Culture of the Courtroom Andrew Taslitz
    FORENSIC LINGUISTICS; VOL 8; ISSU 1; pp. 138-142; 2001

  38. The Inference of Identity in Forensic Speaker Recognition
    Speech Communication, 2000, 31, 2-3, June, 193-203

  39. Telephone Speaker Recognition amongst Members of a Close Social Network
    Forensic Linguistics, 2000, 7, 2, 180-198

  40. Effects of Voice Disguise on Speaking Fundamental Frequency
    Forensic Linguistics, 2000, 7, 2, 149-179

  41. Fixed Linguistic Units in Ransom Notes. Empirical Analyses and Considerations on their Relevance for Forensic Text Analysis
    Zeitschrift fur Germanistische Linguistik, 2000, 28, 3, 377-403

  42. Long- and Short-Term within-Speaker Differences in the Formants of Australian hello
    Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 1999, 29, 1, June, 1-31

  43. Some Observations on the Use of Probability Scales in Forensic Identification
    Forensic Linguistics, 1999, 6, 2, 228-241

  44. On Decision Making in Forensic Casework
    Forensic Linguistics, 1999, 6, 2, 242-264

  45. The Interpretation of Conventional and 'Bayesian' Verbal Scales for Expressing Expert Opinion: A Small Experiment among Jurists
    Forensic Linguistics, 1999, 6, 2, 214-227

  46. Variable Robustness of Nonstandard /r/ in English: Evidence from Accent Disguise
    Forensic Linguistics, 1999, 6, 2, 278-288

  47. Some Observations on Answers to Courtroom Questions
    South African Journal of African Languages, 1999, 19, 4, 237-244

  48. Differences and Distinguishability in the Acoustic Characteristics of Hello in Voices of Similar-Sounding Speakers: A Forensic Phonetic Investigation
    Australian Review of Applied Linguistics, 1999, 22, 1, 1-42

  49. Language and the Law
    Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 1999, 19, 156-173

  50. The Linguistic Rights of Non-English Speaking Suspects, Witnesses, Victims and Defendants
    Chpt in LANGUAGE LEGISLATION AND LINGUISTIC RIGHTS: SELECTED PROCEEDINGS OF THE LANGUAGE LEGISLATION AND LINGUISTIC RIGHTS CONFERENCE, THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN, MARCH, 1996, Kibbee, Douglas A. [Ed], Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1998, pp 24-31

  51. Is Forensic Speaker Identification Unethical-Or Can It Be Unethical Not to Do It?
    Forensic Linguistics, 1998, 5, 1, 10-21

  52. The Correlation between Auditory Speech Sensitivity and Speaker Recognition Ability
    Forensic Linguistics, 1998, 5, 1, 22-32

  53. Making Texts Speak: The Work of the Forensic Linguist
    Studia Anglica Posnaniensia, 1998, 33, 117-130

  54. Linguistics and the Law
    Anglicana Turkuensia, 1998, 16, 127-142

  55. Language as Sole Incriminating Evidence: The Augustynek Case Forensic Linguistics, 1998, 5, 2, 193-202

  56. Forensic Linguistics
    English Today, 1997, 13, 4(52), Oct, 42-47

  57. Identifying Criminals by Their Voice: The Emerging Applied Discipline of Forensic Phonetics
    Australian Language Matters, 1997, 5, 2, Apr-June, 6-7

  58. Ten Unanswered Language Questions about Miranda
    Forensic Linguistics, 1997, 4, 2, 175-196

  59. Some General Phonetic and Forensic Aspects of Speaking Tempo
    Forensic Linguistics, 1997, 4, 1, 48-83

  60. The Problem of F0 and Real-Life Speaker Identification: A Case Study
    Forensic Linguistics, 1996, 3, 1, 155-159

  61. Earwitness Identification: Common Ground, Disputed Territory and Uncharted Areas
    Forensic Linguistics, 1996, 3, 1, 3-13

  62. A Report on the Acoustic Effects of One Type of Disguise
    Forensic Linguistics, 1996, 3, 1, 168-175

  63. Consideration of Guidelines for Earwitness Lineups
    Forensic Linguistics, 1996, 3, 1, 14-23

  64. Integrated Approach to Speaker Recognition in Forensic Applications
    Forensic Linguistics, 1996, 3, 1, 50-64