ProQuest www.csa.com
 
About CSA Products Support & Training News and Events Contact Us
 
RefWorks
  
Discovery Guides Areas
>
>
>
>
>
 
  
e-Journal

 

The Pipe Organ: Its History and an Overview of Examples Around the World
(Released December 2011)

 
  by Sandie Schwenker  

Review

Key Citations

Visuals

News

Glossary

Editor
 
Resources News Articles
Historical Newspapers
Dissertations

News Articles

  1. WATER MADE IT SING

    Lusted, Marcia Amidon, Dig, 11-01-2010

    A SURPRISE IN THE CELLAR! When a Roman emperor sponsored a grand entertainment for the people, music was most always a part of that entertainment. And of all the different types of music available, one of the most fascinating was that made by the hydraulus, or water organ. It was the world's first keyboard instrument, and the ancestor of today's pipe organs.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's eLibrary

  2. Pacific Symphony's New William J Gillespie Concert Organ

    Nott, Carolyn, Musical Opinion, 02-01-2009

    It's incredible that a firm like CB Fisk still exists in the world today. It's like a time warp' said Carl St Clair, Music Director of California's Pacific Symphony, about the makers of a brand new 30-ton, four stories tall, and one-of-a-kind and three-years -in-the -making pipe organ. Named the William J Gillespie Concert Organ after its donor, it resides in the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Hall opened two years ago in Costa Mesa, California, home to the Pacific Symphony and Pacific Chorale. The hand-fashioned silver Fisk pipe organ (Opus 130) remained an intriguing looking façade for a year while the actual instrument was being installed and voiced, having been shipped from Gloucester, Massachusetts, in 'bitesize pieces' in four semi-trailer trucks in mid June 2007. The grand opening on September 18, 2008, coincided with the start of the Pacific Symphony's 30th anniversary season. 'It was overwhelming – a very memorable and special event', continued St Clair. "'The organ is now the heart of the hall'.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's eLibrary

  3. Mine Is Bigger Than Yours

    Alan Farnham, Forbes Magazine, 10-06-2003

    What kind of obsession would induce a man to order an 8,000-pipe organ for his living room? Robert Ridgeway, curator for Jasper Sanfilippo's collection of musical devices, recalls the reaction of a first-time visitor to the Sanfilippo estate in Barrington Hills, Ill. The guest, a wealthy Japanese businessman, happened to love theater organs and had heard that Sanfilippo owned a doozy. The man admired the estate's long driveway. He admired its vestibule. But when the doors to the music room were at last thrown open, says Ridgeway, the man exclaimed, "'Oh! Emperor not live like this!"' It's safe to say no emperor ever has. That's because no one else, royal or commoner, has ever built a 27,000-square-foot living room in which to house the biggest Wurlitzer pipe organ in captivity. This is an instrument so vast that a 50hp, 440-volt blower is needed to supply its breath (10,000 cubic feet per minute), yet so versatile it can play "'Chattanooga Choo-Choo"' one minute (complete with train whistle), and a Debussy delicacy the next.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's eLibrary

Historical Newspapers
  1. NEW MUSICAL INSTRUMENT FOR THE DRAWING-ROOM.

    New York Times (1857-1922). New York, N.Y.: Oct 27, 1865. pg. 1, 1 pgs

    Abstract (Summary) The piano-forte, which has had almost exclusive favor as a drawing-room instrument, is finding a rival in the cabinet organ, recently introduced, and which is receiving much favor in musical circles.

    Original Newspaper Image (PDF)

  2. THE CHARMS OF MUSIC.; How the South Is Improving In a Taste For the Fine Arts.

    The Atlanta Constitution (1881-1945). Atlanta, Ga.: Sep 23, 1883. pg. 4, 1 pgs

    Abstract (Summary) It is gratifying to know that the tatse for the high arts, among people of the south, which has been so much neglected in the past, is now forging ahead with great rapidity and interest. While this tocreases of interest is shown in all the arts, in nothing is it so plainly seen as in music. It used to be a rare thing, a few years ago, to hear of southern people being educated abroad in music, but lately it...

    Original Newspaper Image (PDF)

  3. A NOVELTY IN ORGANS.; ONE WHICH IS BUILT UPON THE MODEL OF THE HUMAN THROAT.

    New York Times (1857-1922). New York, N.Y.: Nov 8, 1885. pg. 14, 1 pgs

    Abstract (Summary) One of the greatest novelties shown at the Franklin Institute Exhibition, in Philadelphia, is the vocalian organ, an invention by James Baillie Hamilton, which is now being manufactured in Worcester, Mass. Mr. Hamilton has ...

    Original Newspaper Image (PDF)

Taken from ProQuest's Historical Newspapers.

Dissertations

  1. Philosophies of pipe organ preservation: Case studies of three churches in Columbia, South Carolina

    by Durbetaki, Lee, M.A., University of South Carolina, 2011 , 82 pages; AAT 1492499

    Abstract (Summary)
    This study examines the preservation philosophies employed by three historic churches in Columbia, South Carolina in relation to their pipe organs. Existing scholarship on historic pipe organs focuses on their technical conservation as well as their significance to the history of music and organbuilding. These three case studies demonstrate the need for evaluating historic pipe organs at the local level of significance and within their cultural, architectural, and spiritual context. These contexts are especially important when considering preservation treatment for a pipe organ. Such treatment, as the case studies demonstrate, is inseparable from the preservation issues concerning the church building itself—issues which are in turn bound up in a church's identity and religious practice. In addition to providing preservationists with a framework for evaluating pipe organs in their local contexts, this study should serve as a useful resource to congregations that contemplate major repair work or preservation treatment for their own instruments.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's Dissertations & Theses Database

  2. Cecilia's Mirror: the Role of the Pipe Organ In the Catholic Church of the United States In the Aftermath of Vatican II

    by Hart, Skye, D.M.A., Arizona State University, 2010 , 119 pages; AAT 3428326

    Abstract (Summary)
    The organ in the Catholic Church of the United States is a mirror of its time, reflecting the various challenges facing Catholic liturgy today. In some cases, it reflects the rich patrimony of European immigrants, anxious to replicate the liturgical conditions they left behind. In others, it reflects the efforts of liturgical reformers to "'update"' the liturgy, creating more opportunities for what they understand to be active participation of the faithful. The absence of the organ in some American Catholic churches, particularly, in the time following the liturgical reforms of Vatican II, raises questions on the direction of sacred music in these churches as well as the survival and viability of the organ as the principal musical instrument of the Catholic liturgy. In all, the organ in American Catholic churches serves as a gauge of the current liturgical climate, and, in a broader sense, the direction and viability of the Catholic Church in America. In this paper, I argue that the survival of the organ in American Catholic churches depends largely on the number of Catholics who continue to remain active in the Church, as well as their views on liturgy, and their musical formation. While recent figures indicate a gradual decline in membership in the Catholic Church among younger generations, interest in organ and traditional Catholic sacred music by some Catholics may ensure the organ's continued presence. The extent to which some groups implement liturgical directives of Pope Benedict XVI, and the activities of groups that support traditional Roman Catholic liturgy, play a role in the organ's continued survival. Also crucial are those who support the organ for its own artistic and musical merit, including contemporary composers of liturgical organ music, organ students in Catholic higher education programs, and organ builders. As opposed to total extinction, the use of the organ in American Catholic churches may take on a new shape, surrounded by a church that struggles to reconcile modern culture with the transcendent.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's Dissertations & Theses Database

  3. The common origin of the German contrapuntal organ school and the French classical organ school from the perspective of organ construction, organ music and organ technique

    by Miller, Margaret R., M.A., Florida Atlantic University, 2010 , 129 pages; AAT 1489885

    Abstract (Summary)
    This study examines the development of German pipe organ culture and French classical pipe organ culture from a single common origin in the Duchy of Brabant, during 1450-1850, with respect to select major attributes of organ construction, organ music and organ technique. The respective music of Dieterich Buxtehude (1637-1707), Praeludium in G Minor , BuxWV 149, for the North German contrapuntalists, and of César Franck (1822- 1890), Choral No. 3 in A Minor , for the classical French symphonic tradition, is highlighted and appended with suggested technique for each work.

    For full-text documents see ProQuest's Dissertations & Theses Database